I want to do with my acting what chef Ferran Adrià has done with food

Every once and a while we run smack dab into something that literally rocks our world. For me it was when my  mouth met the Ferran Adrià liquified olive via Jose Andres. O.k bear with me I know what your thinking how can an olive change your life. But suppose it could, lets suspend reality for a bit. Is that not what we do as actors? Don’t we implore our audience to suspend reality when they step into a movie house or enter the theater?

In their dynamic contribution to the world of molecular gastronomy Chef Ferran Adrià and Chef Jose Andres have indeed required of us to suspend reality. Let us take the aforementioned “olive”. We’ve all had olives stuffed, minced, raw, pressed, cold pressed, etc.  Now enter the liquified olive.

Image Let me inform you of my first encounter with this olive. I had discovered this olive and Chef Adrià two years ago. Since that time I have been dreaming and thinking of how it would taste, what the experience would be like. Listening to Chef Adrià talk about his method, his inspiration for this olive, how he “creates his character” has never left me. Very rarely in my short life have I come across an artist or a performance that touches me so.  Performances that cause such an impact on me that I can be walking down a street and pieces of it pops into my mind. I could be reading a book and there it appears, they’ve become a part of my soul. For example Susan Kohner and Juanita Moore in An Imitation of Life, Al Pacino in Dog Day Afternoon, Halle Berry in Monsters Ball.

So as I watched the waiter bring over the tray of olives my heart began to race. They were placed on the table and I suddenly was breathless. I lifted the spoon, opened my mouth and allowed the olive to slide onto the center of my tongue. I let it sit there for a moment as I thought to myself, after two years its finally in my mouth. I gave a gentle press of the tongue and the olive exploded. It hit the salty, sour, bitter, sweet parts of my tongue all at once, and then I exploded. I had left my body. When I returned I opened my eyes, I looked at the spoon and then… I liked it. I did not want the experience to be over.

That is what a good night at the theater should be. When I perform on stage I want my audience to “lick the spoon”. When anyone buys a ticket for a film I’m in, I want them to “lick the spoon”. I want to do with my acting what chef Ferran Adrià does with food

Salute!

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